fbpx
blog posts in languages:

My latest blog posts

Côte d’Azure recipe: Tarte tomates et mozzarella

                  I have been cooking up a storm recently in preparation for guests who are visiting my home in France. What I love most about cooking in France is the abundance of delicious fresh ingredients, especially the tomatoes – French tomatoes have

Read More »

A Secret Disgrace by Penny Jordan

Over the course of her writing career Penny Jordan wrote 187 books for Mills & Boon, of which I have read many. There was a hint of sadness and poignancy, then, as I read this book to review for the publisher, because it is Penny’s last book, written in her

Read More »

Hannah Fielding, traveller

I was born in Alexandria, and now live part of the year in France and the other part in England. In between, I’ve travelled extensively around the world. If you’re interested to read more about my travels, take a look at the Wanderlust travel website, which has published an interview

Read More »

Favourite film: The ultimate rom-com, Bringing Up Baby

It’s funny to think, now, that this film, made way back in 1938 and starring Hollywood greats Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn, was not a success when it was first released. Today, it’s widely regarded as a classic in cinematic history, the pioneer of the screwball comedy and one of

Read More »

An insider's guide to the south of France

Don’t miss my article on travel website Wanderlust, ‘An insider’s guide to the south of France’, in which I share my top five off-the-beaten-track places near my home in the Côte d’Azure. Visit http://www.wanderlust.co.uk/magazine/blogs/insider-secrets/an-insiders-guide-to-the-south-of-france.

Read More »

A place called ‘home’

Marvin Gaye famously sang ‘Wherever I lay my hat, that’s my home’. The inference is that, snail-like, you can carry your home with you, within you, allowing you to live nomadically without the pull to a particular place, rootless and free. It’s a fabulous song, but one whose sentiment I’m

Read More »

WIN a romantic holiday in Kenya

UK readers, don’t miss this week’s Burning Embers competitions in Women’s Own and Now magazines, for your chance to win a romantic holiday for two to Kenya. Now magazine competition The prize is an all-inclusive nine-night stay at the glamorous Papillon Lagoon Reef resort, plus a trip to the Tsavo National Park and

Read More »

Love that weathers the storms

Tempestuous, tumultuous, wild, stormy, turbulent, electric, thunderous – these are words we’re used to reading in romance novels in descriptions of the passionate relationship between the man and the woman. They of course relate to the elements: Nature demonstrating her power through storms. I recently read the last novel of

Read More »

Review: Pleasures of a Tempted Lady by Jennifer Haymore

You know that moment when you rather wearily order a desert in a restaurant, knowing you are full and not expecting much of the crème brûlée, but when you take that first spoonful – oh my! It’s delicious, and at once you give up following the conversation of your companions

Read More »

Colourful flowers: The poet’s darling

Have you heard of chromotherapy? It’s a sort of therapy that draws upon colour to rebalance and heal. It’s labelled pseudoscientific by some, and I’ve no personal experience of it. But it seems to me that colours do have significance. If I wear black from head to toe, I can

Read More »

The birth of a writer

When does the urge to be a writer commence? The nights, as a young toddler, that you sit on your parent’s knee and gaze at the scenes in a picture book while the words you hear spoken twist and gallop and soothe all around you? The time you first hold

Read More »

Book review: The Promise of Home by Kathryn Springer

A heart-warming, touching ‘clean’ romance with a charming setting and appealing characters. I found myself absorbed in the story from the first pages, starting as it does with two frightened and traumatised children who pull at your heart strings, and their caring but way out of her depth aunt, Jenna.

Read More »

‘The Most Romantic…’ survey

I always keep an eye out for news items that report on surveys on matters related to the heart. Usually, the results affirm that plenty of people in the world are as much hopeless romantics as am I! This week, then, I decided to set up my own romance survey

Read More »

London voted the most romantic city

A carriage ride around verdant Hyde Park. A stroll along the Thames at dusk, admiring the misty lights of the Houses of Parliament. A coffee in a pavement cafe in Covent Garden, watching opera singers vie with circus performers for the public’s attention. A wander around the National Portrait Gallery,

Read More »

Les Gorges du Verdon

Gorges du Verdon, a beautiful nature resort half an hour from our house in France. There are some wonderful restaurants around there.

Read More »

Queens of literature

With the Queen on most people’s minds, the Huffington Post recently published a list of favourite queens from literature. They included three queens from Alice in Wonderland, Tatiana from A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Guinevere from the many stories of King Arthur, Lady Macbeth from Macbeth, the White Witch from the Narnia

Read More »

A princess, a treetop hotel, a Kenyan landscape… a queen

Did you watch any of the Queen’s jubilee celebrations on the television? I enjoyed watching the flotilla, the fireworks after the concert and the coverage of the National Service of Thanksgiving; but what most drew my attention was the television footage of the Royal Family from many years ago. One

Read More »

Summer Giveaway

It’s summer (I know it’s raining, but check the calendar), and I’m delighted to be participating in Red Hot Books’ Shameless Summer Giveaway Hop. For a chance to win a print copy of Burning Embers this month, simply comment on this post. Now, here’s a list of all the lovely

Read More »

Book review: Changeling by Philippa Gregory

Although this book is pitched as a young adult novel, and I generally don’t read within this genre, I love Philippa Gregory’s historical fiction and so was keen to read her latest offering, which is a departure from her norm, focusing as it does on four fictional characters rather than

Read More »

Favourite ballets: Les Sylphides

When I was a young girl, one of my favourite treats was a visit to the ballet. For this special occasion my parents my sister and I wore evening clothes. The Sayed Darwish Theatre in Alexandria, which in those days was called the Mohamed Ali Theatre, hosted some of the

Read More »

The red moon

When I close my eyes and conjure up a picture of Africa, the setting of my novel Burning Embers, it is the colours that are most vivid. The dry yellow of the savannah. A terracotta building. A coral-pink kapok tree. Every shade of green among the leaves of the jungle.

Read More »

A new feature on my website: Book reviews

It has been several months now since I first began this blog and website, and I have very much enjoyed developing it and learning more about publishing and sharing books (what did I do before GoodReads?). Now that Burning Embers has been published, I have encountered a whole new area

Read More »

Book review: To Be Queen by Christy English

I loved this book. The cover drew me in – especially the unusually silky textured paper – and sitting in my garden, I was transported to a bygone era, lost in a world of kings and queens and religion and politics and ambitions and dreams. While the book is full

Read More »

Port des Issambres – a view for writers

What do you think of the view? This is a beautiful port near my home in France. I sometimes take a thermos of coffee and a baguette of ham and cheese and spend the day writing there. Excitingly, this is my first blog hop. The hop is hosted here: http://omnificpublishing.blogspot.co.uk/. Enjoy!

Read More »

The creatures of African legends

When I was a teenager my family had a friend called Mr Chiumbo Wangai who was from Kenya. He would tell us all about his homeland – the landscapes, the people, the cultures. But my favourite tales were those he related based on African legends. And when I came to

Read More »

Chasing waterfalls

There is something so romantic about a waterfall. The roaring of the water in your ears; the rainbow of colours reflected in the downpour; the shock of the plummet from the horizontal river; the sense of nature’s might. Little wonder, then, that those who dream up love stories are drawn

Read More »

My latest blog posts

Indiscretion Blog Tour: Review by Books with Bunny

“If you like your romances filled with smouldering Mediterranean men, secrets and lies, then Indiscretion could be the perfect read for you this Easter.” Today you can read a review of Indiscretion over at Books with Bunny: http://bookswithbunny.blogspot.co.uk/2015/04/indiscretion-hannah-fielding-blog-tour.html  

Read More »

Andalusian memories

With my new novel out now, what better way to set the mood for this passionate, fiery, epic love story than explorethe beautiful region of Spain in which it is set: Andalusia. I first visited as a young woman, when after university I went travelling around Europe, and since then

Read More »

Letting the cat out of the bag: On spoilers

Do you ever have a week when synchronicity leads you to keep encountering a term or idea, causing you to stop and give it some thought? This week, I have ‘spoilers’ on the brain. First, authors accidentally dropping spoilers. One poor author has spoken of her distress when she realised

Read More »

Venice in the Moonlight by Elizabeth McKenna

From the blurb: After her husband’s untimely demise, Marietta Gatti is banished from the family’s villa by her spiteful mother-in-law. She returns to her hometown of Venice and her only kin—a father she hasn’t spoken to since her forced marriage. Her hope of making amends is crushed when she learns

Read More »

The flamenco arts

When I write a novel, I immerse myself in the culture of the setting. For Indiscretion, set in Andalusia, Spain, that was an absolute pleasure, for it meant many hours enjoying one of my favourite art forms: the flamenco. The flamenco originated in Andalusia in the eighteenth century, and it

Read More »

Respect for romance: signs of change

I have written before on my blog about the poor reputation of romance as a fiction genre. It’s simply not as respected as many other genres, and neverhas been. But there are signs of a change in the wind. According to an article in the Smithsonian magazine: ‘[A] new breed

Read More »

My latest blog posts

The lyre: playing the music of Ancient Greece

If I could create a ‘booktrack’ for my new novel Aphrodite’s Tears (a musical soundtrack to which you listen while reading), it would feature prominently one instrument: the lyre. Here is one of my favourite musical scenes in the book, which occurs during the Epiklisi festival, when the islanders of

Read More »

On authors reading their own novels

In July, author Michael Ondaatje was awarded the ‘Golden’ Man Booker Prize, when his novel The English Patient was voted the most popular Man Booker Prize-winner of all time. In his acceptance speech (which you can read at http://lithub.com/michael-ondaatjes-golden-man-booker-speech-is-really-great/), Michael said this: I’ve not read The English Patient since it came out in

Read More »

A brief overview of Ancient Greek architecture

My interest in ancient civilisations began with the stories I was told by my parents and governess in childhood – but it was cemented by glimpses of the physical remains of those civilisations: the Pyramids at Giza, the Colosseum in Rome, the many ruins on the Greek island of Delos, birthplace

Read More »

Favourite settings from my fiction

‘We travel, some of us forever, to seek other places, other lives, other souls.’ So wrote novelist Anais Nin. What a perfect explanation for the inner need to travel, don’t you think? Without my own travels – driven by my curiosity to learn about new places and peoples, past and

Read More »

Amphitrite – an overlooked Greek goddess

Imagine you are a sea nymph, one of the fifty daughters born to Nereus and Doris (the daughter of Oceanus). You are perfectly happy in your life in the ocean – but then you catch the eye of a god. The most powerful god in your domain: Poseidon. He wants you

Read More »

History unearthed: Olympia, Greece

The heroine of my latest novel, Aphrodite’s Tears, is an archaeologist with a passion for ancient civilisations. I imagine she would have been thrilled to read of a recent discovery by archaeologists: a clay tablet inscribed with what is believed to be the earliest written record of Homer’s epic poem

Read More »

Archive

Archive

Search the post archive by publishing date
Search the post archive by category